Category Archives: etsy

Planning for Positivity in 2014

crafting a business 101

Last time we discussed what we’ve accomplished in 2013. Maybe you even took the time to print out the free printable to note down all the great things you’ve done last year. If not, think about it! Before moving forward, it’s important to reflect on what your goals were in the past, what you checked off the list, and where you fell short. At least for me, it gives me a much needed kick in the pants to jump start my goal planning for the next year.

printable planner by VintPrintShop on Etsy

printable planner by VintPrintShop on Etsy

Thus, it’s time to think about 2014 (yes, I know 2014 started like…a month ago…I guess my kick in the pants wasn’t quite hard enough!). Putting your goals for the year in writing holds you accountable. It’s hard for me to remember whether I successfully met my goals if I can’t even remember them in a few months!

To get the juices flowing, here are some pointers to think about regarding your creative business’ goals:

  • Start with your business’ finances – When we think about business goals, the first thing most of our minds go to is probably the dollar signs. It’s easiest to start b examining the dollar signs from last year and making goals related to your business’ finances, and most likely and specifically, your sales. Think about how much money you’d like to make with your small business in 2014 and go from there (but make it realistic yall!). That being said, don’t forget your expenses. The sales side is important, but if you spend a boatload on supplies, shipping stuff, or advertising, then all that cash outflow is going to negate your cash inflow. Think about how you will control expenses this year, and plan accordingly. Think you can reduce shipping expenses by buying mailers in bulk twice a year instead of running to the post office every week?
  • Next, look at your non-financial numbers  – Facebook fans, repeat customers, Instagram followers, Etsy shop stats, whatever applies to you. How can you boost these numbers?
  • Come up with action items for all these numeric goals. If your plan is to increase revenue, what will you do to increase those sales dollars? Will you advertise in a new venue? Will you offer a new line of products? Create gift sets at a higher price point? If your goal is to encourage repeat customers, how will you entice them? Offer coupon codes with a purchase? Send a personalized note or free gift? Explore all your options. The more doable actionable items you can think of for each goal, the higher your chance of accomplishing it. As I said last year, don’t set yourself up for failure. Examine what you achieved in 2013 and be realistic about 2014. What were your sales, expenses, and profit like last year?  If you plan on tripling revenue this year, you best have a plan to get there! You can’t just make it a goal to triple your sales, your revenue, or your facebook fans (that’s called wishing, not planning) without thinking about how. If those are your goals, come up with some concrete, doable action items that will help you get there.
  • Again, your goals should be specific and measurable. Don’t just say “I want to increase sales”. Come up with an actual benchmark dollar amount (like “I want to make $5000 in sales.” or “I want to average $2000 in sales per month.”). Giving yourself specific benchmarks will increase your motivation to reach them. Plus, they make it easier to measure whether or not you were successful.
  • Don’t forget about business-related goals that might not be apparent right away just because they aren’t related to sales or numbers. Do you need to simplify or get organized? Keep better records? Do you want to acquire a new skill, like take better product photos, learn Photoshop, or write blog articles? For example, my business goals will include sorting through and re-organizing all my jewelry-making supplies and cleaning up my inventory tracking spreadsheets. I also want to get better at continuously and consistently listing new items in my Etsy shop. Meeting these goals will make my life easier and my business more organized, and thus will indirectly improve my sales and boost my business!

Here’s a basic four-page worksheet to record your 2014 goals. Feel free to print and include in your creative business binder. There’s a space at the top to include your business name. I split the worksheet into four categories of business goals, and each table has space for you to write your specific goal, how you will measure your success, the goal’s deadline, and any action items you can do to achieve it. Click here- 2014 Goals Worksheet – My Creative Business or on the pictures to download the free 4-page printable.

business goals planning worksheet  2014 review3

2014 review2

2014 review4Your goals should be very specific to your business needs, but to get the wheels turning, here are some examples of goals (repasting from last year):

Sales goals:

  • Increase sales revenue
  • Increase number of sales
  • Increase sales on particular venues (Etsy, shopify, own website, offline, craft show, local, etc.)
  • Increase average revenue per order
  • Increase orders of multiple items
  • Begin selling in X amount of boutiques or shops
  • Participate in X number of craft shows
  • Financial goals:
    • Increase profit (net income = sales revenue less expenses)
    • Decrease expenses
    • Keep better inventory records
    • Consistently track expenses, sales, inventory, supplies, etc.
    • Improve records for tax purposes
    • Improve pricing formula
    • Boost profit margin
  • Marketing goals:
    • Increase facebook fans or twitter followers
    • Increase Etsy views, hearts, etc.
    • Increase blog/website/e-newsletter subscribers or views
    • Increase number of blog posts/facebook posts/tweets each week or month
    • Develop your own website/blog/e-newsletter/direct mailing list
    • Make the frontpage of Etsy X times
    • Get published in a print or e-magainze
    • Guest post on other blogs
    • Participate more in Etsy teams or other forums
    • Make X amount of Etsy treasuries
    • Get featured on a specific relevant website
    • Leave business materials in X amount of local businesses
  • Other Business Goals:
    • List X amount of new items on Etsy each week/month
    • Develop X amount of new product lines this year
    • Revamp your logo, brand, website, shop, etc.
    • Redesign or develop your business cards, custom catalog, etc.
    • Learn more about specific business topics, like SEO, HTML, product photography, bookkeeping, etc.
    • Complete your creative business plan.

Write your goals down and keep them in a visible place. Throughout the year, you should take time once a month or once a quarter to review your goals, determine your progress, and adjust as needed. Seeing your goals will give you the kick in the pants you might need every now and then to get back on track.

What are some of your goals for your creative business in 2014?

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What is overhead and why do I need to know about it for my creative small business?

accounting for small business owners, etsy business

Last time in our Creative Accounting series, we discussed how important it is to keep track of every expense related to your creative small business. Today, we’ll zoom in on a particular category of your expenses, called “overhead”.

No, I’m not talking about you buying an overhead projector. Overhead is a term used in cost or manufacturing accounting (sounds scary? it is!). Your overhead expenses are all the expenses you incur to design, create, or manufacture your product, but they are not directly traceable to an individual product.

If you were running a giant factory and creating widgets, your overhead expenses would be things like the rent, utilities, wages to pay your factory workers, insurance, marketing fees, advertising, tools, machines, and indirect materials. These are all costs that are vital to keeping your business running. Without them, you would not be in operation, but you can’t exactly trace them to your finished products…like how much of your electricity bill helped generate that one widget? I’m sure with some complicated formula we could figure that out, but we don’t have time for that. We’ve got stuff to make!

expenses_28sept2009_0522

expenses_28sept2009_0522 (Photo credit: patrick h. lauke)

Your handcrafted small business has overhead expenses too. You probably spend money on lots of things that keep your business running smoothly, yet these expenses are not directly, easily traceable to every item you create. If you go back to the last post about your business’ expenses, the expense categories like indirect supplies and materials costs, tools, machines and other items used, and all of the non-product costs should be considered overhead expenses for your business.

In my humble opinion, one of the biggest mistakes Etsy entrepreneurs make is not taking these overhead expenses into account when pricing their goods. Like we mentioned in the past post, most of these expenses are deductible for tax purposes, but you should also try to recoup a little piece of your overhead expenses in every sale you make. I’m not going to talk about pricing formulas and those specifics today, but the point is you need to be thinking of the most sensible way to include a tiny portion of your overhead expenses in the price of each and every item you list for sale.

How do you go about doing that? Well, I’d start by tallying your estimated overhead expenses, either on a monthly or annual basis, whatever is easiest for you. That includes the following types of expenses:

accounting help for creative entrepreneurs

just a few examples of the overhead expenses your etsy business may incur

Once you get to an annual estimated total of these expenses, you need to find a way to work backwards to include a piece of this total sum in your pricing formula. There are lots of ways to do this. Here are just a few possibilities:

  • Estimate how many products you will create this year. Take your total overhead expense number and divide it by the number of items. Add that number to the sales price of each item you list for sale. For example, $1000 in annual overhead divided by making 350 items this year means I need to increase the price of each item by $2.85 or so to recoup a chunk of overhead in every sale I make.
  • Same method as above, but instead of estimating your total items produced, estimate the total number of items you hope to sell this year. That way you are getting closer to truly recouping that overhead expense back with each and every sale.
  • Instead of adding a flat “fixed” overhead dollar amount to each sale price, you can use a percentage markup instead. Once you know the cost of direct materials and labor that went into creating a specific product, you might multiply that total by a specific overhead percentage (determined based on what feels sensible to you). For example, if these earrings cost me $6 to create and my overhead percentage is 20%, then I’m saying that product required about $1.20 of overhead expense to make, and really cost me $7.20 in total to create.

All overhead methods have their pros and cons. Using a fixed flat overhead rate is easiest, but using the same rate across the board for every product you make might not be best representing your true overhead costs per product. On the other hand, the percentage method allows you to add more overhead costs to your more expensive or time-consuming products, which probably really do use more overhead expenses. It all depends on what makes sense to you. The important thing is that you try to do something to include these costs somewhere in your pricing formula. If you don’t, you are much less likely to ever recover those expenses, and at the end of the day, your business is making less real profit than you might think. So get cracking on thinking about overhead!

I’d love to hear from you! What do you think is the most challenging part about bookkeeping for your handmade business?

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Using Google Analytics & Adding Google Analytics to your Etsy site

marketing for small businesses

Before we really delve into methods of marketing and spreading the word about your shop, let’s take a look at one of the sources you can utilize to evaluate the success of your future marketing efforts: Google Analytics. It’s a good idea to set up (or revisit your existing) Google Analytics account now, so that once you begin trying different marketing techniques, you can see if they’re making a difference.

Google Analytics (GA) is a metrics-tracking tool that gives the owner of a URL all sorts of interesting information about their site’s visitors, views, and more. Signing up for GA is 100% free! To link your Etsy shop URL to Google Analytics, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Use your etsy shop’s main web address, http:// shopname .etsy. com (without the spaces), as the account name or default URL. Google will automatically capture the activity on both your shop page itself and all the little sub-pages for each of your listings.
  • Once you’re done with set up, GA should take you to your “Account Overview” page. Click the “Tracking Info” tab to find your Tracking ID. You can copy and paste this ID on Etsy to link the two accounts. You do NOT need to worry about pasting any HTML or javascript info to link your shop to your GA. That’s for non-Etsy stuff.
  • On the Etsy side, click “Your Shop” in the upper right corner, then scroll down and click “Options”, then click the “Web Analytics” tab. You can paste your GA tracking ID into the “Web Analytics” box here. It make take up to 24 hours for your GA account to begin working.
  • Check out the Etsy help page for more detailed info.

Now the fun begins! Your default GA landing page gives you a brief overview of the audience of your Etsy shop over the last month. If you scroll down, you’ll see a bunch of nifty percentages and even a pie chart of your repeat vs. new visitors. Hover your mouse over any of the stats to get a definition of that item.

To get more specific detail, check out the side bar on the left side of your screen. It could take you hours to examine all the juicy info under each of these items! Under “Audience”, you can find out what countries your visitors are visiting from, how many pages on your shop they’re checking out, and how long each visitor stays on your site on average.

“Traffic Sources” will tell you how people are finding your shop – via search terms, directly, or from other websites. You can even compare which source is giving you the highest rate of new visitors or which visitors spend the most time browsing your shop. This info helps you determine where your marketing time is most well spent; for example, I might notice that I’m getting lots of visitors from my Wanelo page, but those visitors spent an average of 50 seconds on my site and my bounce rate is in the 90s. Sounds like it’s not really worth my time to market there, and I might chose a source that has visitors with longer visitation lengths and lower bounce rates.

My favorite part of GA is the “Real Time” page. This page actually tells you how many visitors are currently on your page, where they’re coming from, and what they’re looking at during this very minute. You might think it’s a little creepy to cyber-spy on shoppers, but this is your chance to get some immediate feedback on how people are interacting with your shop! Next time you’re bored, go visit your Real Time page and watch what your next Etsy visitor does!

This is just barely skimming the iceberg of everything GA offers. The important part is to get set up and familiar with your stats as they are right now. It’s a good idea to record your current bounce rate and pages per visit. After you begin to put new marketing or advertising measures in place, GA will help you determine the effectiveness of your efforts! So get accustomed to your metrics now, and let’s work on getting them to improve!

Are you a stats junkie like me? Are you excited or intimidated by Google Analytics?

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Related Articles:

Planning for Positivity in 2013

crafting a business 101

Last post of 2012! We’re running out of time to think about our goals for the new year. Like we’ve talked about before here, here and here, it’s time to brainstorm and put in writing a set of measurable, specific goals for your creative business to strive for in 2013.

Here are some guidelines to consider when brainstorming goals for your creative business:

  • Don’t set yourself up for failure. Examine what you achieved in 2012. What were your sales, revenue, and profit-levels like this year? What are some realistic goals for 2013? Your goals should require some challenge and “stretch”, but still be attainable with a bit of hard work.
  • Your goals should be specific and measurable. Don’t just say “I want to increase sales”. Come up with an actual benchmark dollar amount (like “I want to make $5000 in sales.” or “I want to average $2000 in sales per month.”). Giving yourself specific benchmarks will increase your motivation to reach them. Plus, they make it easier to measure whether you were successful or not.
  • Your goals should have deadlines in order to hold yourself accountable. If you’re like me, you work better (and harder!) under a deadline.
  • Think about the path to achieving each goal you set from every angle. I want to increase profit. To do that, I can work on increasing sales revenue and decreasing expenses and overhead.
  • Sometimes it’s about quality and not quantity. One of my goals for Lazy Owl is to increase my sales numbers, but if I make a whole lot of $10 sales, I’m not really boosting my bottom line as much as if I made more $40 sales. Thus, my goals also include increasing items sold per order and to offer more higher-priced popular items.
  • All your goals don’t need to be about sales numbers or dollar amounts. Maybe you need to keep better track of your sales and expenses for tax records. That can be a goal, with a specific measurement of updating your records at least once a week. You might also think about increasing your fan base numbers on your facebook page or other business-related websites. There are many other business areas you can think about improving that indirectly increase sales and profits.

Here’s a basic two-page worksheet to record your 2013 goals on. Feel free to print and include in your creative business binder. There’s a space at the top to include your business name. I split the worksheet into four categories of business goals, and each table has space for you to write your specific goal, how you will measure your success, and that goal’s deadline.

2013 Goal Worksheet pg 1

Your goals should be very specific to your business needs, but to get the wheels turning, here are some examples of goals:

  • Sales goals:
    • Increase sales revenue
    • Increase number of sales
    • Increase sales on particular venues (Etsy, bigcartel, own website, offline, craft show, local, etc.)
    • Increase average revenue per order
    • Increase orders of multiple items
    • Begin selling in X amount of boutiques or shops
    • Participate in X number of craft shows
  • Financial goals:
    • Increase profit (net income = sales revenue less expenses)
    • Decrease expenses
    • Keep better inventory records
    • Consistently track expenses, sales, inventory, supplies, etc.
    • Improve records for tax purposes
    • Improve pricing formula
    • Boost profit margin
  • Marketing goals:
    • Increase facebook fans or twitter followers
    • Increase Etsy views, hearts, etc.
    • Increase blog/website/e-newsletter subscribers or views
    • Increase number of blog posts/facebook posts/tweets each week or month
    • Develop your own website/blog/e-newsletter/direct mailing list
    • Make the frontpage of Etsy X times
    • Get published in a print or e-magainze
    • Guest post on other blogs
    • Participate more in Etsy teams or other forums
    • Make X amount of Etsy treasuries
    • Get featured on a specific relevant website
    • Leave business materials in X amount of local businesses
  • Other Business Goals:
    • List X amount of new items on Etsy each week/month
    • Develop X amount of new product lines this year
    • Revamp your logo, brand, website, shop, etc.
    • Redesign or develop your business cards, custom catalog, etc.
    • Learn more about specific business topics, like SEO, HTML, product photography, bookkeeping, etc.
    • Complete your creative business plan.

    Write your goals down and keep them in a visible place. Throughout the year, you should take some time once a month or at least once a quarter to review your goals, determine your progress, and adjust as necessary. Seeing your goals will give you the kick in the pants you might need every now and then to get back on track.

I hope this helped you to begin thinking about planning for next year. I wish you, your loved ones, and your creative business success and happiness in 2013! See you next year yall!

What are some of your most important goals for your creative business in 2013?

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A Year in Reflection

Etsy

Etsy (Photo credit: Scott Beale)

I was inspired by this post to reflect on the year 2012 and what I’ve accomplished. I agree that it’s all too easy to think back on the year and focus on all the things left undone, all those goals I didn’t reach or things I didn’t achieve. Sure, we can always do better, but that’s what planning for 2013 is for right? Let’s take some time to focus on all the things we did achieve this year.

2012 was a year of slow but steady growth for me:

  • Reached and surpassed 100 fans on facebook
  • Surpassed my goal of having more than 100 Etsy sales in 2012, I actually had 240+ sales this year (and it ain’t over yet!)
  • Became a part of a local store in Houston, Roundtable Goods, and networked with lots of amazing local artists
  • Revamped my new website and began writing a little bit more regularly
  • Participated in several shows, including my first wedding show
  • Finally put up a few of my “backburner” or “dream” products up for sale in the shop, like a yarn wreath and mixed media necklaces
  • Quit my day job and switched to a new part-time teaching job to have more time to spend on my own business!

It’s important to boost yourself up with positive thinking every now and then (or all the time really, haha). Take some time to reflect on the year and all the great things you accomplished. Feel free to use the printable worksheet below.

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Inspiration Station: Your Ideal Work Day

Remember that post about planning out our goals for 2013? Well, we need to get some specific, measurable goals laid out. Just like with the creative business plan, I like to start thinking about things from a big picture point of view, then slowly zoom in to the nitty gritty details.

Before I come up with my specific 2013 goals, I’m going to brainstorm what my ideal work day looks like. Then I can work backwards to see what exactly I need to accomplish with my business to be able to have that “ideal work day” every work day! Make sense?

So here we ago, my ideal work day for Lazy Owl:

  • 8:30 – 9:30 – Wake up, have morning coffee and (healthy) breakfast whilst reading daily blogroll, taking notes on any business ideas or inspiration that interests me. Commenting on my favorite blogs and doing some social networking!
  • 9:30 –  11:00 – Fill and package outstanding Etsy orders. Respond to customer emails and questions. Work on updating inventory and sales records. Evaluate supply and inventory levels. Re-order supplies if necessary. Do other Etsy admin tasks as needed.
  • 11:00 – 1:30 – Run to post office, run other errands. Take the dogs for a walk. Have lunch. Take a break or go to the gym (hey, I said ideal day right).
  • 1:30 – 4:00 – Work on website & blog. Draft and post new article(s). Brainstorm new topics and series ideas. Social media marketing and networking.
  • 4:00 – 5:30 – Photograph new Etsy listings, list online.
  • 5:30 – 9:00 – Break time! Do household chores, eat dinner, spend time with husband, etc.
  • 9:00 – 10:30 – Crafting time! Work on new jewelry items or whatever else I’m crafting up.
  • Bedtime at midnight.

Ok, so it was actually quite weird for me to write all that out on an hour-by-hour basis. It made me feel like there’s so much time in a day, but in reality I am always scrambling to fit all these things in. I don’t know if that schedule is actually livable for me, but my goal is that during my ideal day I would love to be able to squeeze in:

  • Time to research what’s going on in the blogosphere, on Etsy, and with other Etsy businesses (this is my biggest problem, I find content I want to delve into, open it in a new Firefox tab, but then end up with 60 open tabs that I never seem to have time to go back and truly read)
  • Write for the blog
  • Generate meaningful content for my website, market and connect with other businesses and potential customers, promote Lazy Owl to my target audience
  • Create new products, photograph and list them
  • Take time for myself and for my family – be outside, exercise, be healthy, have some fun!
  • Run errands and do household chores without falling behind
  • Support local businesses and connect with my local community

Realistically, I can probably not do all of these things in one day. But now I know what I would like to do with my time, and what is most important to me. That is half the battle. I can make goals to get closer to be able to have this ideal day now!

What does your ideal work day look like? Download the above worksheet for helping you plan out your ideal work day.

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It’s our one year Etsyversary!

Oh happy day!  At the end of this month we will be celebrating Lazy Owl Boutique’s one year Etsyversary (that’s our Etsy anniversary, just in case you couldn’t figure that out)!

One year ago this month I was going through a lot of changes.  I was just beginning a well-deserved vacation at the beach away from my hell job when I got a wonderful offer for a new job.  I debated for a few days, scared out of my mind.  I had never actually quit a job before.  I always just had to leave because I was graduating, leaving to study abroad, etc.  I returned from the beach well-rested and at peace with my decision and put in my two week’s notice that Monday morning.

Over the next few weeks I created, created, and created on overdrive, along with taking lots of photos and figuring out how the heck to get started on Etsy.  By the end of May, Lazy Owl Boutique officially opened for business!  It was definitely slow going at first, but it has been a very rewarding experience and I’m delighted to say that in less than a year we have reached over 100 sales!

We’ve made some mistakes but learned a lot along the way in just one year.  Check out this awful product photography for example:

Ay yi yi!  Talk about gloomy.

We’ve fine-tuned the creating/photographing/listing process and even begun to sell in person at craft shows!  We are even in the process of joining with a handful of other local handmade artisans to open a unique handmade boutique in Houston (stay tuned)!

One year ago I would’ve never thought I’d be capable of doing all that I am now.  And I have all of you to thank!  So thanks to all my family, friends, fellow artists, and customers who have supported Lazy Owl on this journey.
To celebrate our one year Etsyversary, we are giving away hairpin freebies! Get one freebie hairpin with a purchase of $10 or more, and two hairpins with a purchase of $30 or more! Check out Lazy Owl’s facebook page to pick out your favorite hairpin(s) and include your top four preferences in the note to seller during checkout!
You can also view the hairpin selection below:
Free hairpin choices!

Throw Me Somethin’ Mister!

Mardi Gras 2012 is Tuesday, February 21.  That means we are right in the thick of Mardi Gras season for the next month!  This time of year makes me think of king cake, blaring trumpets, and lots and lots of beads.

When I was little, my mom often took us to the huge (and family-oriented) parades in Kenner and Metarie, just outside of New Orleans.  Every year I was in college (all 6 of them, haha), I squished in a car with my friends and we drove to New Orleans, usually jamming about 12 people into one hotel room.  Mardi Gras in New Orleans is truly a unique experience.  I probably wouldn’t be able to handle it now that I’m older, but the memories of limping down Bourbon Street in sticky shoes, eating Popeye’s red beans and rice at 3am, and sitting on someone’s shoulders desperately trying to catch the biggest beads will always make me smile.

Now that we are in Houston, we celebrate a very sedate Mardi Gras season.  My husband made a king cake, and I’ve decided to honor Mardi Gras by creating earrings with authentic parade doubloons.  If you aren’t that familiar with Mardi Gras traditions, you may know about catching beads at parades, but there are also doubloons.  Each year every Mardi Gras krewe creates limited edition doubloons, which are basically big shiny aluminum coins, to throw at their parade.  The doubloons usually have the year, the krewe name, and the theme or name of the krewe’s parade that year engraved on them.

These Mardi Gras earrings are a great way to wear a little piece of Mardi Gras tradition during this season, whether you are participating in carnival season somewhere in Louisiana, or just want to celebrate the good times wherever you call home!

Silver doubloon earrings by Lazy Owl Boutique
Shiny blue doubloon earrings by Lazy Owl Boutique
Gold Mardi Gras earrings by Lazy Owl Boutique

Party like it’s 2012

Hello!  Welcome to 2012!  Obviously I did not intend on taking a nearly two-month long vacation from the blogosphere, but December and the holidays turned out to be busier than I thought.  I hope that all of you had a peaceful (and successful, if you are a fellow Etsian like myself) holiday season!

With the beginning of every new year, I like to follow the trend of setting some goals and coming up with a resolution or two.  This year I read an article about the 101 Things in 1001 Days Challenge.  1001 days is three years, so coming up with 101 goals in 3 years gives you the time and opportunity to do some serious long-term thinking and planning.

2012 Weekly Planner PDF by milas on Etsy

I then stumbled upon the awesome website, Day Zero, and decided to set up my very own 101 things list.  You can see my list here.  I still haven’t thought of all 101 things, I could only get about 80, so I have some room to grow.  I tried to come up with a mix of fun things I’ve always wanted to do and serious goals I need to do, along with a few things that I’d love to happen but don’t know if they are possible (like weigh 140 pounds…ha…ha….).

I welcome you to create a Day Zero list with me to motivate yourself to meet your goals for the next three years.

Here are a few of the items on my list, many of them pertaining to Lazy Owl Boutique.  They say you should make your goals quanitifiable and specific, so you can see I chose a specific number for many of them.

– Learn how to sew
– Cook a meal in the crock pot (I’ve told you I like never…cook)
– Paint every room in the house (ouch)
– Go to the beach (yay!)
– Learn Italian
– Go to Italy (TBD in a later post!)
– Cook 10 recipes from Pinterest
– Make 150 sales on Etsy (hopefully over the next 3 years, this will be possible, so far I’m at 10 out of 150)
– Write 50 blog entries!  Here we go!
– Sell at 5 craft shows (hopefully more)
– Make 30 things from Pinterest
– Read 75 books
– Eat at every Pappa’s restaurant (it’s a Houston thing)
– Make an ottoman/bench out of our old coffee table
– Eat on our wedding china at least twice (since we’ve never eaten on it at all)
– Bake 10 different types of cupcakes, yay!
– Be on the frontpage of Etsy 5 times (I’ve managed to get on it once this year already!)

So, now you can follow along with me as I try to complete this goals over the next 1001 days.  Let me know if you decide to make your own list, and we can share.  I need more ideas for goals!

Stocking Stuffers and a Sale

Happy almost Thanksgiving yall!

In honor of Thanksgiving/Black Friday/Cyber Monday, I’m offering free shipping all this week.  Use coupon code TURKEY for FREE domestic shipping!  This is a great way to get unique, handmade gifts without having to fight the crowds at the mall, but without having to pay extra for shipping!

Sneak a peek at some of the cutie patootie stocking stuffers, all for $14 or less, that I have in stock right now.  I’m about to list TONS more over the week too!

Mint green rosette studs for just $9!

Hot pink mum earrings for $10

Cute as a button! Heart button earrings<

Plum rose earrings

Gold wire-wrapped sea green pearl ring

Mint Dahlia adjustable ring